Comparten soluciones tecnológicas a problemas sociales

See note below, this is a re-post and not the writing of the owner of this site.

Autor: Julio Rivas Rojas
Fecha: 08/05/2017

<a title="IMG_20170328_170618" href="https://flickr.com/photos/ken_bauer/33324823920">IMG_20170328_170618</a> flickr photo by <a href="https://flickr.com/people/ken_bauer">kenbauer</a> shared under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/">Creative Commons (BY-NC-SA) license</a> </small>
A lo largo de las 10 sesiones, estudiantes de Mecatrónica, Sistemas Computacionales y Biomédicos, de ambas culturas, compararon y encontraron posibles soluciones a diversos conflictos cotidianos.

¿Cómo la ciencia de la computación puede impactar más en la sociedad? Con esa pregunta como punto de partida, alumnos del Tecnológico de Monterrey en Guadalajara y de la MacEwan University entablaron conversaciones a través de videollamadas en las que discutieron sobre apps que ayudan a resolver problemáticas sociales.

La dinámica fue parte del proyecto de intercambio cultural entre jóvenes estudiantes a cargo del profesor Ken Bauer, del Campus Guadalajara, y Cam Macdonell de la casa de estudios canadiense.

Continue reading “Comparten soluciones tecnológicas a problemas sociales”

Giving Students an Authentic Voice

flickr photo by mikefisher821 https://flickr.com/photos/grade6kms/5111671478 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license

Conference Presentation

This is support for my short 15 minute presentation at the 3rd Annual International Conference on Innovation in Education (my translation to English) in Mexico City on December 13, 2016.

Tools of the Trade

I’ve written before about my work with various tools, the focus lately is on student blogging and using a FeedWordPress setup to create a connected course where my students (and anyone else) can view the syndicated posts of the students in a single place.

Continue reading “Giving Students an Authentic Voice”

More than Rescue the Semester

flickr photo by English106 https://flickr.com/photos/english106/4357228667 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Post Conference Reflections

I was away for four days of classes last week but I left work for my #TC101 #TC1019 and #TC2027 classes. They shouldn’t miss my presence in front of the room since I’m not the focus of the class. Some of those students embrace that fact but some are still reaching to grok what I mean by this student-centred and flipped (in the sense of flipping roles) classroom.

I know, it is difficult, it is messy, but as my good friend (now I actually met her in person) Laura Gogia says it right on the title of her blog “Messy Thinking“. I was able to rename this blog to “Connecting is Learning” through her influence and that of many other amazing educators at (and not at but present through the wonders of Virtually Connecting) #OpenEd16 in Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Students are People

Continue reading “More than Rescue the Semester”

Closer to the Heart

flickr photo by Roberta Baker https://flickr.com/photos/robertabaker/9231071375 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

I “Heart” Education

So perhaps I keep coming back to this same theme about relationships in education and that relates to (finally) getting around to changing the title of my blog to #ConnectingIsLearning.  If you don’t want to read about passion for education, move on to another blog or post.

Continue reading “Closer to the Heart”

Control, FOLE, Pedagogy and Hugs

Image shared publicly on Facebook by "Tochito y Americano en imagen", click link for source.

Students, Teachers and Control

Control is a curious word. Many of my colleagues at the Tecnológico de Monterrey know me as “that flipping teacher” which comes from my embracing #flipclass four years ago and evangelizing that approach to colleagues on campus, across the system as well as nationally and internationally.

Yes, #flipclass has been good to me but it tends to pigeonhole me with that label. I do so much more in my classroom (connected classrooms, #oer, giving my students voice, active learning) which I consider going beyond flipped class. I really should blog more about my classroom. Hmm.

The key component of #flipclass to me and the most important “flip” for me is the flip of responsibility in the classroom. I want my students to take control of their learning while I slide into a role as a guide and mentor.  Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams talk about this in their book “Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day

Guide on the side and not the sage on the stage.
— Bergmann and  Sams

Another inspiration on my pedagogy is Keith Hughes (@hiphughes on Twitter), go search out his #TeacherTips which should become coffee table books for teacher’s lounges.  One key concept I take from Keith is the term “Facilitator of Learning Experiences”. I love that expression and use it often to explain my role in the classroom.

I would prefer you go watch and listen to Keith explain this:

Continue reading “Control, FOLE, Pedagogy and Hugs”

Teaching Evaluation Comments: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

flickr photo by Cayusa https://flickr.com/photos/cayusa/4969367529 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license

All the Things are New

One aspect that I particularly love about my institution where I work is our ability to move quickly and make changes. We had been using the same online system for teaching evaluations for quite a long time (perhaps a decade?) and made a change in format, questions, scale and focus this past year. The instrument actually changed again in January in reaction to the previous semester I assume. I did not play a role in the design of the instrument but did give my feedback on early versions before it was released. As always, the comments are the most important section of teaching evaluations.

Continue reading “Teaching Evaluation Comments: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”

Using Twitter with my Students

creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by marek.sotak: http://flickr.com/photos/30032901@N04/3275031724

Communication is Key

I am a big believer in the Flipped Classroom and the focus on “the best use of classroom time” as Jon Bergmann (and many others) describes it.

For my classes and in particular my style of working with my students I find that the time outside of the classroom is equally important. The issue becomes how to keep connected with each other outside.

I’ve used many tools for this over the past 20 years or so:

On to Twitter

creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by marek.sotak: http://flickr.com/photos/30032901@N04/3275031724
creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by marek.sotak: http://flickr.com/photos/30032901@N04/3275031724

I want the ability for my students to express their ideas and calls for help to the entire class (and course since I usually teach multiple groups) as well as the world at large.

We use a hashtag (#TC1014 and #TC1017 for the courses this semester) to communicate about the class. Students often send me direct messages (DMs) as well but I am trying to encourage them to be more open.

Is it Working?

I tried this in previous semesters and it did not “stick”. I think the reason is that I offered other options like the course LMS and a Facebook group for each course. Now this is the main option and (some) students are using it.

Here is one example, note the communication using images (screenshots) as well as the time stamps here. I can’t be sure but some other students might have learned from this conversation and I used this example of communication in class time to stress the importance of:

  • Asking for help is okay.
  • Asking in public increases the chances that others will answer.
  • Showing details (screenshots or links to code) is important.

Permission before Posting

By-the-way, I asked Samir if I could post this conversation.

How are you using Twitter?

Your turn now. Is Twitter useful for you with your students or in your professional practice as an educator? Let us know in the comments.

 


feature image is creative commons licensed (BY-2.0) flickr photo by marek.sotak

FlipCon15 – Sharing, Caring and Mastery

Creating a Culture of Sharing, Caring and Mastery

Abstract

My goal as a facilitator of educational experiences is focused on creating a sharing culture where students not only take responsibility for their own educational pace but also contribute to the learning of their peers. The first half of this session is sharing the technology and techniques I use to foster this environment inside and outside of my classroom.P1170047

I view my main task as getting my students excited about learning computing science to increase their chances of a successful student and professional life. I still need to create formative and summative assessments to ensure they are prepared for the courses that follow. I use common tools as well as my own custom testing platform for in my courses. In the second half of this session, I will share those tools and experiences with the audience. The tools I use could be easily adapted to all levels and topics.

Videos

Please watch the videos and include in the survey (see below) form your comments or questions about my students’ experiences with a Flipped Mastery classroom.

Survey

Please fill out the survey if you plan to attend (or even if you don’t) my session at FlipCon15.

 

FlipClass FlashBlog – Part Three

Another Boromir meme.

And This Week’s Topic

And Now for Something Completely Different

Since January 2014 I have a policy where all homework assignments (of which I have two types) are all due on the last day of classes. So this semester that will be at 5:30pm (local time in Guadalajara) on May 6th, 2015.

Are you Serious?

Another Boromir meme.
Another Boromir meme.

Yes, this works and here is Why

I’ve thought a lot about why students do not hand in homework early (well humans in general). The answer lies in following the incentives.

In most classes (including mine until about 5 years ago) there was no reason to hand in assignments early. Let us list the advantages:

  • You feel good about yourself
  • The teacher (if she notices) thinks you are amazing.
  • ummm. can’t think of anything else

Now, let’s list the reasons students wait until the last minute:

  • That physics/calculus/computing teacher that always screws up the homework problem and it turns out the problem was impossible to solve. Haha, that funny teacher #someoneShootMeForWastingHours
  • The teacher that always extends the deadline when they notice that nobody has done it yet (vicious cycle anyone?)
  • If I wait until all of my friends do it, they can help me
  • I get a buzz off that last minute rush
  • I could think of more, but this blog post is due soon……

Let’s Flip the Due Dates

See what I did there? Yeah, I’m hilarious under a #flashBlog time crunch.  Instead of having students base their schedule on “What’s due tomorrow so I can start today?”, I want them to move towards “What is available that I can work on now?”

That’s It?

Well yeah and it works pretty well. I want to talk about this in much more detail at my FlipCon15 talk in Michigan so I’m saving all of the “good stuff” for then.

I sure hope that gets accepted. Details, details.

Your Turn

So, am I nuts? Are my students lining up to lynch me for yet another serious of crazy experiments from their Canadian teacher here in México? Let me know!