Flipped Learning Workshop – Campus Morelia

Workshop Outline

My classrooms are very student-centred whether I am working with my undergraduate students or my faculty colleagues. This is really a rough outline and I hope, expect and encourage you to push our workshop in the direction that works best for all of you.

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Using Twitter with my Students

Communication is Key

I am a big believer in the Flipped Classroom and the focus on “the best use of classroom time” as Jon Bergmann (and many others) describes it.

For my classes and in particular my style of working with my students I find that the time outside of the classroom is equally important. The issue becomes how to keep connected with each other outside.

I’ve used many tools for this over the past 20 years or so:

On to Twitter

creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by marek.sotak: http://flickr.com/photos/30032901@N04/3275031724
creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by marek.sotak: http://flickr.com/photos/30032901@N04/3275031724

I want the ability for my students to express their ideas and calls for help to the entire class (and course since I usually teach multiple groups) as well as the world at large.

We use a hashtag (#TC1014 and #TC1017 for the courses this semester) to communicate about the class. Students often send me direct messages (DMs) as well but I am trying to encourage them to be more open.

Is it Working?

I tried this in previous semesters and it did not “stick”. I think the reason is that I offered other options like the course LMS and a Facebook group for each course. Now this is the main option and (some) students are using it.

Here is one example, note the communication using images (screenshots) as well as the time stamps here. I can’t be sure but some other students might have learned from this conversation and I used this example of communication in class time to stress the importance of:

  • Asking for help is okay.
  • Asking in public increases the chances that others will answer.
  • Showing details (screenshots or links to code) is important.

Permission before Posting

By-the-way, I asked Samir if I could post this conversation.

How are you using Twitter?

Your turn now. Is Twitter useful for you with your students or in your professional practice as an educator? Let us know in the comments.

 


feature image is creative commons licensed (BY-2.0) flickr photo by marek.sotak

FlipCon15 – Sharing, Caring and Mastery

Creating a Culture of Sharing, Caring and Mastery

Abstract

My goal as a facilitator of educational experiences is focused on creating a sharing culture where students not only take responsibility for their own educational pace but also contribute to the learning of their peers. The first half of this session is sharing the technology and techniques I use to foster this environment inside and outside of my classroom.P1170047

I view my main task as getting my students excited about learning computing science to increase their chances of a successful student and professional life. I still need to create formative and summative assessments to ensure they are prepared for the courses that follow. I use common tools as well as my own custom testing platform for in my courses. In the second half of this session, I will share those tools and experiences with the audience. The tools I use could be easily adapted to all levels and topics.

Videos

Please watch the videos and include in the survey (see below) form your comments or questions about my students’ experiences with a Flipped Mastery classroom.

Survey

Please fill out the survey if you plan to attend (or even if you don’t) my session at FlipCon15.

 

FlipClass FlashBlog – Part Three

And This Week’s Topic

And Now for Something Completely Different

Since January 2014 I have a policy where all homework assignments (of which I have two types) are all due on the last day of classes. So this semester that will be at 5:30pm (local time in Guadalajara) on May 6th, 2015.

Are you Serious?

Another Boromir meme.
Another Boromir meme.

Yes, this works and here is Why

I’ve thought a lot about why students do not hand in homework early (well humans in general). The answer lies in following the incentives.

In most classes (including mine until about 5 years ago) there was no reason to hand in assignments early. Let us list the advantages:

  • You feel good about yourself
  • The teacher (if she notices) thinks you are amazing.
  • ummm. can’t think of anything else

Now, let’s list the reasons students wait until the last minute:

  • That physics/calculus/computing teacher that always screws up the homework problem and it turns out the problem was impossible to solve. Haha, that funny teacher #someoneShootMeForWastingHours
  • The teacher that always extends the deadline when they notice that nobody has done it yet (vicious cycle anyone?)
  • If I wait until all of my friends do it, they can help me
  • I get a buzz off that last minute rush
  • I could think of more, but this blog post is due soon……

Let’s Flip the Due Dates

See what I did there? Yeah, I’m hilarious under a #flashBlog time crunch.  Instead of having students base their schedule on “What’s due tomorrow so I can start today?”, I want them to move towards “What is available that I can work on now?”

That’s It?

Well yeah and it works pretty well. I want to talk about this in much more detail at my FlipCon15 talk in Michigan so I’m saving all of the “good stuff” for then.

I sure hope that gets accepted. Details, details.

Your Turn

So, am I nuts? Are my students lining up to lynch me for yet another serious of crazy experiments from their Canadian teacher here in México? Let me know!

Mastery

Flipped Mastery Classes

I’m finishing up my 4th semester of applying a flipped classroom and with some encouragement from my peers I decided to “take it to the next level” this semester. Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams call this the Flipped Mastery Method.

This semester my classes have a list of topics that each student needs to demonstrate their mastery in. The format for showing their mastery is completely open and graded on an OSU (Outstanding, Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory) scale.

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WordPress in the Classroom

WordPress Official Logo, click for site.
WordPress Official Logo, click for site.

WordPress Blogs for Projects

This semester I am teaching a course which is project based and the students are developing applications for Android in small teams. This is first time I have taught this course and the first time in over a year that I am teaching an upper level course in our program. The program was closed (long story) for two years and re-opened just over two years ago so we now have students in their 6th semester of studies of a nice semester program.

Sharing their Work

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Twitter for Teachers

Courtesy of http://www.edtechspot.com/7-ways-educators-can-effectively-use-twitter/
Courtesy of http://www.edtechspot.com/7-ways-educators-can-effectively-use-twitter/

Are you on Twitter?

I’ve been using Twitter for over five years apparently but my use has picked up significantly in the last year. Twiage.com tells me my “Twitter age” to the day as seen below.

But I don’t want to tweet about what I ate.

Yes, there are many people tweeting about what they ate for breakfast/lunch/dinner or their location on any particular time of day. Twitter is a social media platform and we can use it for whatever we choose.

So how do I use it for Education?

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Schoology First Impressions

19467848_b63feca025_mSurprised by Schoology

As mentioned last week, I’ve moved to Schoology as my LMS (Learning Management System) for my courses this semester. I am teaching a total of four groups across three separate courses which means I put two groups of the same course (Fundamentals of Programming using Python) together.

The biggest win for me so far has been the engagement of my students in discussing the out-of-class assigned videos/readings/activities.  I use a modified WSQ system (Watch/Summarize/Question) but please see Crystal Kirch’s (@crystalkirch on Twitter) explanation on her blog.

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Engage Students with Facebook

Facebook image, click image to see original at Flickr
Facebook for Your Classes. Photo credit, click the image.

Go where they are: Facebook

A long time ago I was able to engage my students via newsgroups (nntp) or the forums in Moodle or Blackboard. Lately getting students to post on the forums in my LMS has become a chore.

So I decided to try something different last semester and “go where they are”: Facebook.

This worked amazing well. Engagement of my students in discussions outside the classroom exploded.

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