Third version of my Concept Map on Ungrading.

Background

As our assignment this week for our course #augment1, I set out to experiment with some Concept Mapping tools. I am a co-learner with Howard Rheingold and about 20+ brave souls in the online class which lasts five weeks (wrapping up this next week) titled “Augmented Collective Intelligence: Theory and Practice“.

Since my submissions for OpenEd19 in Phoenix, AZ were both accepted recently and one of them is RoundTable on #Ungrading, I decided that a concept map on Ungrading would be relevant. For those interested, the other accepted submission is a lightning talk on setting up a FeedWordPress instance for a connected course.

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I signed up for a course run by the one and only Howard Rheingold and am excited to start this week. I will be posting to the course site internal blogs but will share excerpts of my experience out here in the open as well.

Here is the work for the first week, the course kicks off with a video session on May2/May3. I believe we have about 30 co-learners in the course.

Copying from the syllabus below. You can view the syllabus of the course here: http://augment1.holocene.cc/syllabus?destination=syllabus

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Leap of Faith flickr photo by eatbitter shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license

Teamwork

This is part of my work in a team working on our TC1014 Fundamentals of Programming course at the Tecnológico de Monterrey and submitted as the stage 2 document.

Principle Characteristics

Implementing CBP moves the focus from learning of concepts to developing skills through practice. Ideally each competency is small enough to give opportunity to display mastery of each separately before moving on to the next competency. Individualized learning through order of completion as well as method of demonstrating mastery are key components for our implementation.

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"Looking back" flickr photo by Infomastern https://flickr.com/photos/infomastern/10759800423 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license

Looking Back

I truly believe that reflection or looking back is an important part of our learning process. Taking time for reflection allows me to connect what I’ve learned in the past with my plans going forward.  I’m reminded again of why I changed the title of my blog to “Connecting is Learning” and will once again give credit to that change to my good friend Laura Goglia who has been a key influencer on my this past year. Follow through her tweet to her post and you can even read my comment on that blog post or you can just go straight to her post “Lessons Learned 2016”.

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flickr photo by English106 https://flickr.com/photos/english106/4357228667 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Post Conference Reflections

I was away for four days of classes last week but I left work for my #TC101 #TC1019 and #TC2027 classes. They shouldn’t miss my presence in front of the room since I’m not the focus of the class. Some of those students embrace that fact but some are still reaching to grok what I mean by this student-centred and flipped (in the sense of flipping roles) classroom.

I know, it is difficult, it is messy, but as my good friend (now I actually met her in person) Laura Gogia says it right on the title of her blog “Messy Thinking“. I was able to rename this blog to “Connecting is Learning” through her influence and that of many other amazing educators at (and not at but present through the wonders of Virtually Connecting) #OpenEd16 in Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Students are People

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flickr photo by Orange_Beard https://flickr.com/photos/metrojp/85740389 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Podcasts are in my earbuds.

I had a request weeks ago from my colleague Ivan here on campus and I’ve been meaning to write this for months. So here goes my list of podcasts currently on my Android phone. For those interested, I have the paid version of BeyondPod. I honestly don’t remember what benefits the paid version gives but I tend to purchase apps (and services) that I use often to give support for creators.

I list the categories in the order of my playlist algorithm. News comes first since I want to hear those as close to release as feasible. If not, they would be “olds” then anyway. I list the podcasts within each category in alphabetical order as they appear on my device.

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Students, Teachers and Control

Control is a curious word. Many of my colleagues at the Tecnológico de Monterrey know me as “that flipping teacher” which comes from my embracing #flipclass four years ago and evangelizing that approach to colleagues on campus, across the system as well as nationally and internationally.

Yes, #flipclass has been good to me but it tends to pigeonhole me with that label. I do so much more in my classroom (connected classrooms, #oer, giving my students voice, active learning) which I consider going beyond flipped class. I really should blog more about my classroom. Hmm.

The key component of #flipclass to me and the most important “flip” for me is the flip of responsibility in the classroom. I want my students to take control of their learning while I slide into a role as a guide and mentor.  Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams talk about this in their book “Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day

Guide on the side and not the sage on the stage.
— Bergmann and  Sams

Another inspiration on my pedagogy is Keith Hughes (@hiphughes on Twitter), go search out his #TeacherTips which should become coffee table books for teacher’s lounges.  One key concept I take from Keith is the term “Facilitator of Learning Experiences”. I love that expression and use it often to explain my role in the classroom.

I would prefer you go watch and listen to Keith explain this:

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