Creating a Culture of Sharing, Caring and Mastery

Abstract

My goal as a facilitator of educational experiences is focused on creating a sharing culture where students not only take responsibility for their own educational pace but also contribute to the learning of their peers. The first half of this session is sharing the technology and techniques I use to foster this environment inside and outside of my classroom.P1170047

I view my main task as getting my students excited about learning computing science to increase their chances of a successful student and professional life. I still need to create formative and summative assessments to ensure they are prepared for the courses that follow. I use common tools as well as my own custom testing platform for in my courses. In the second half of this session, I will share those tools and experiences with the audience. The tools I use could be easily adapted to all levels and topics.

Videos

Please watch the videos and include in the survey (see below) form your comments or questions about my students’ experiences with a Flipped Mastery classroom.

Survey

Please fill out the survey if you plan to attend (or even if you don’t) my session at FlipCon15.

 

creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by chuckoutrearseats: http://flickr.com/photos/48625620@N00/4898356318

feature image is creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by chuckoutrearseats:


My Classroom

I am a transplanted Canadian that has been living and teaching in Zapopan, Jalisco, México for most of the past twenty years at the Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Guadalajara.

I have always focused on giving my students broad learning around the content of the course in question as well as pushing them to be active and visible in their academic and social pursuits.

Flipped Learning

Three years ago I was introduce to Flipped Classroom and jumped on that bandwagon not so much to change my classroom but because I felt that this “way of teaching” validated how I already ran my  classrooms. The most important part of Flipped Learning for me is the community of educators that I follow and how we can help each other become better at our craft of guiding our students on their learning journeys.

creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by chuckoutrearseats: http://flickr.com/photos/48625620@N00/4898356318
creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by chuckoutrearseats: http://flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4898356318

Lately I’ve been leading colleagues in their discovery of Flipped Learning as one of many tools in their educator toolbox.

I’m currently offering a course on Flipped Learning in a connected courses format. In the past (and future) I gave courses on blogging with WordPress, tools for formative assessment, tools for writing research (LaTeX, bibliography management), software development and collaboration.

Connected Courses

Click on image for source.
Click on image for source.

This leads me to my finding of the connected courses community.  As usual I latched onto the ideas of others since I have no problem standing on the shoulders of giants. So my courses have been moved to a connected course  system.  I happen to be a practicing systems administrator (LAMP in general) so I let to get “under the hood” and control the environment my way.

Why I am Here?

I love expanding my circle of friends and colleagues and especially with those working in domains that I don’t encounter everyday. I hope to share my ideas as well as gain from the ideas of others.  Currently I am looking to push my research forward in the area of education (I am a Computer Scientist formally) and am struggling at how to get that area of research kicked off.

 

creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by cogdogblog: http://flickr.com/photos/cogdog/16730075532

Digital Learning Day 2015

Flexible EnvironmentOn Friday March 13th, 2015 many teachers will open their classrooms to show the public what their flipped classroom looks like. You can find more information at the Flipped Learning Network website. I plan to open my class at 2:30pm – 3:45pm as well as offer a information session following that class at 4pm. The direct form to sign up to see my class is here.

This is at the Guadalajara Campus of the Tecnológico de Monterrey. Please arrange to visit ahead of time so we ensure you can enter the campus and have information at the security gate of why you will enter the campus. The session locations are as follows:

  • 2:30pm-3:45pm Open Class in room 1402 (building 1, 4th/top floor, room 2)
  • 4pm-5:15pm “Aula Invertida”(slides here) in room 1405, right down the hall from the other session.

Feel free to attend both, only one or contact me for future information about sessions, courses and talks about Flipped Learning

Video about the Sessions

Come see how this works

Source: http://electriceducator.blogspot.mx/2010/09/flip-your-classroom-through-reverse.html
Source: http://electriceducator.blogspot.mx/2010/09/flip-your-classroom-through-reverse.html

My entire course as well as the submissions of my students are online for you to view at this website: Courses by Ken. This course (syllabus here) is an introductory course in computer programming at the undergraduate level for non-computing engineering majors. The website linked is used for both courses.  The course TC1017 (Solutions to Problems with Programming with C++) is the one that I will be showing on Friday the 13th; the other course is TC1014 (Fundamentals of Programming with Python) is the equivalent course for computing program majors.

What will you see

This class meets twice per week over the 16 week semester. At the beginning of each week I record a video for the classes (usually the same video is for both variations of the course since the content is very similar). You can see the collection of videos for this course on my YouTube list for them

To be honest, every day in my classroom varies depending on the needs of the students at that time. The students are in between our exam periods so should be in the “normal pace” of activities which include:

  1. working on a sequence of activities that I loosely format based on what Crystal Kirch‘s WSQ assignments.  There is an average of one of these per week during our 16 week semester.
  2. choosing with mastery topics they are able to meet as well as to which level (on an OSU – Outstanding/Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale) they will show mastery. There are 30 mastery topics they need to meet for mastery of the course content.
  3. taking formative assessment activities which can be in class quizzes using a platform such as Socrative or Kahoot! or a quiz they can do on their own time (and multiple times).
  4. perhaps working on the project (in pairs) that is due at the end of the semester.

Since my style of a mastery based classroom puts the deadlines on the activities #1,#2,#4 above are all  on the last day of class May 6th, many students are at different levels. This is intentional. I have a varied range of prior experience in computing with my groups since some have 10+ years of programming experience before arriving and many others have close to no prior experience.

I start the class with a pep talk about what to be working on as well as addressing any common questions and then spend most of the time in the classroom working with individual students or small groups.

Are you Curious?

creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by cogdogblog: http://flickr.com/photos/cogdog/16730075532
creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by cogdogblog: http://flickr.com/photos/cogdog/16730075532

Please come visit this course or contact me to arrange to talk about my implementation of Flipped Learning, I am always eager to discuss my work with others. You can also see what we are doing in my Open Course on Flipped Learning which is currently running and I plan to offer it again starting in May 2015.

Another Boromir meme.

And This Week’s Topic

And Now for Something Completely Different

Since January 2014 I have a policy where all homework assignments (of which I have two types) are all due on the last day of classes. So this semester that will be at 5:30pm (local time in Guadalajara) on May 6th, 2015.

Are you Serious?

Another Boromir meme.
Another Boromir meme.

Yes, this works and here is Why

I’ve thought a lot about why students do not hand in homework early (well humans in general). The answer lies in following the incentives.

In most classes (including mine until about 5 years ago) there was no reason to hand in assignments early. Let us list the advantages:

  • You feel good about yourself
  • The teacher (if she notices) thinks you are amazing.
  • ummm. can’t think of anything else

Now, let’s list the reasons students wait until the last minute:

  • That physics/calculus/computing teacher that always screws up the homework problem and it turns out the problem was impossible to solve. Haha, that funny teacher #someoneShootMeForWastingHours
  • The teacher that always extends the deadline when they notice that nobody has done it yet (vicious cycle anyone?)
  • If I wait until all of my friends do it, they can help me
  • I get a buzz off that last minute rush
  • I could think of more, but this blog post is due soon……

Let’s Flip the Due Dates

See what I did there? Yeah, I’m hilarious under a #flashBlog time crunch.  Instead of having students base their schedule on “What’s due tomorrow so I can start today?”, I want them to move towards “What is available that I can work on now?”

That’s It?

Well yeah and it works pretty well. I want to talk about this in much more detail at my FlipCon15 talk in Michigan so I’m saving all of the “good stuff” for then.

I sure hope that gets accepted. Details, details.

Your Turn

So, am I nuts? Are my students lining up to lynch me for yet another serious of crazy experiments from their Canadian teacher here in México? Let me know!

Challenged AcceptedP8HNi4g

So I was happy to have the chance to get a full #flipclass chat in this evening. Today is the first day of a new semester, I already wrote about my big plans for this year so this post is not about that. I don’t feel stuck in practice but I do have something to write about. You can see my courses live (we just started today) over here on my WordPress connected course hub. Special shout-out to Brian Bennett for pointing me to the cool stuff in the #CCourses community

Here is how it went down.

Not Flipped on First Day

So today was the “typical” first day of class for 3 sections of two classes I am teaching. I basically spend the whole class talking to say I won’t be talking/lecturing much for the rest of the semester. I need to figure out how to get past that on the first day. Any ideas out there? Input is more than welcome?

Click image for source.
Click image for source.

My Personal Kryptonite

Okay, here we get into what my biggest weak point or sticking point is for #flipclass. How do get to the shy students, the ones that say “everything is cool/fine/alright” when I check in with them in class?

I spent a good amount of time working on discussing why it is important to ask for help and how we can all help each other as a community. Perhaps this new adventure in getting my students to share openly #indieWeb style which is also known as Connected Courses (see the DS106 project) will get them talking more and bring them out into the open. I don’t know yet but I have to try something different.

Your Input is Welcome

Feel free to comment here or even better via Twitter with our amazingly awesome personal learning network (PLN) on the #flipclass chat Monday evenings 8pm Eastern Time or just anytime of day/night using that hashtag.

Post Activity Thoughts

I will link the blogs shared during the flash-blog activity (@guster4lovers will post soon). Here they are courtesy of Cheryl Morris on her blog.

Click on image for source.

A New Hope Start

Click on image for source.
Click on image for source.

Tomorrow we start another semester and a new year. I am looking forward to another year full of challenges and meeting new students.

Connect All The Things

I moved my course out of my Learning Management System and onto a a site of its own site influenced by the Connected Course setup. I am so glad to have found the work of Jim Groom (@jimgroom) and the rest of the folks in this area. Check out the great example of a connected course at the DS106 site.

Thanks

Another big shoutout to Brian Bennett (@bennettscience) for pointing me in the right direction, to Brian Lamb (@brlamb) for answering my questions on Twitter and an extra big internet hug to Alan Levine (@cogdog) for his helpful blog post series on the plumbing of a connected course. I probably could have done this without them but they all made this so much easier and fun because we are all #betterTogether on the internet.

Dahl and Nygaard

Remembering Pioneers

I find myself in Vancouver at SIGGRAPH 2014. This was the same location of my first conference back at OOPSLA 1992. I was still an undergraduate student in Computer Science at the University of Victoria, Bjorn Freeman-Benson was my professor of a topic course in Object-Oriented Programming and had invited us to be volunteers at some conference in Vancouver.  Little did I know that this would lead to me volunteering with OOPSLA, SIGPLAN and the ACM from 1994 through 2007 as a member of the conference organizing committee.

Strange how one small event leads to so much in life. I could write volumes about how OOPSLA has impacted mine.

Simula 67

Continue reading

Flipped Learning Network Logo

Pillars of Flipped Learning

Flipped Learning Network LogoThe Flipped Learning Network (FLN) announced a formal definition of the term “Flipped Learning” back in March, you should go read that definition on their site here.

You may choose to agree with parts and have disagreements with other parts of the definition but I think it is important that the FLN set out this definition to give us talking points and a concrete document to point people to

Continue reading

Professional Development

Flipped Professional Development

This week I started a course on Flipped Learning for about 70 teachers in the RZO (Rectoria Zona Occidente) as part of their professional development program. This course is given online in a format that is an experiment for myself and the teachers in the course.

I’ve never done a course like this and this is the first time that I am teaching to people that I can’t reach out and physically touch in the classroom. There are in fact two colleagues from Campus Guadalajara in the course so I have some direct feedback which I think will help me.

My Fears

Continue reading

What it means to Teach

What it means to Teach and LearnThis morning I received a message from a student which made my day.

Happy birthday Ken! And thanks for what you do every day for students and education. I follow you on Twitter (I am a quiet twitter) and I admire the passion with which you promote this new style of education. You are certainly one of the best teachers I had in my school days. Regards!

This is why I teach. I have the ability to impact the way students learn and prepare for life-long learning. In fact lately I’ve been trying to have a larger impact by sharing my experiences and ideas with other teachers.

Of course, I learn from my students and colleagues at least as much as they learn from me.

Photo Credit

Original photo courtesy of [email protected]